China, Russia & Pakistan A Possible New Superpower Triangle

Newsletter SignUp

Iranian Alliance with the triangle may oust US, allies from Middle East

China, Russia, and Pakistan may form an unofficial alliance to counter global dominance of other superpowers. China, Russia, Pakistan, and other authoritarian counties in Central Asia can join their forces to try and take away dominance of western countries. However, the western countries are not twiddling thumbs either as they have a number of allies in Asia, all of whom are ready to jump into the fire and die for the Americans on the battlefield.

If that happens and China, Russia and Pakistan would go to war against the western countries and their allies in the one way or another, either side would put nuclear weapons to work. And given the fact that Russia, China and Pakistan have about 7,620 nuclear warheads combined, the western allies would lose that nuclear war instantly.

There are a number of reasons why we’re coming toward a bipolar world with Russia, China and Pakistan on one side and the western countries and allies on the other side. First, Russia has been actively strengthening military ties with both China and Pakistan. In fact, Russia has just received a crucial support from on the most important global issue of our time: Syria. But what’s even more concerning is that Russia has been strengthening its diplomatic and military ties with Pakistan, its Cold War rival. Having both China and Pakistan on their side would get Russia a serious advantage in an imminent nuclear war against the U.S. Second, China has been very supportive of not only Russia, but also Pakistan lately. In fact, Pakistan has always been China’s traditional ally and Beijing has always protected Islamabad against its historical rival, India.

Third, Beijing, Moscow, and Islamabad see the need to form the China-Russia-Pakistan triangle, because it would finally allow them to put an end to global dominance of western countries and allies which are weak right now for being divided over number of issues. Since Russian President Vladimir Putin is known for his sophisticated plans to attack enemies at the most inopportune times for them, there is a high chance Russia would seek China’s military support to strike their mutual enemy. A few weeks back, Russia sent a contingent of its soldiers to hold Pak-Russian military drills. The move was interpreted as Putin’s excuse to send his ground forces into Pakistan to protect his ally against India.

The drills came at a time when tensions between Pakistan and India reached its peak level following an attack on the Uri military camp in India-held Kashmir. India, which has nuclear weapons on its own, is actually a crucial player in the imminent bipolar world.  Earlier this year, India rejected an offer from the U.S. to join naval patrols in the South-China Sea alongside Japan and Australia. Patrolling the South-China Sea alongside Japan would mean the end of India’s diplomatic relations with China, the move that India is definitely not prepared to do.

Russia, China and Pakistan on one side and the western countries and allies on the other side. First, Russia has been actively strengthening military ties with both China and Pakistan. In fact, Russia has just received a crucial support from on the most important global issue of our time: Syria. But what’s even more concerning is that Russia has been strengthening its diplomatic and military ties with Pakistan, its Cold War rival. Having both China and Pakistan on their side would get Russia a serious advantage in an imminent nuclear war against the U.S.

Even though India has been criticizing Russia for its military cooperation with Pakistan, New Delhi has a number of joint military projects with Russia of its own.  So India is sort of torn apart between China-Russia and the United States. But Pakistan has surely already made up its mind which bed is cozier, and it went with China and Russia. Interestingly, China supplies Pakistan with more weapons than any other country in the world. But more importantly, Beijing is actively building nuclear reactors in Pakistan, which means China wants to strengthen its allies and prepare them for a possible war with the West. Beijing has already pledged to help Pakistan in the case of any foreign aggression.

While the Russians haven’t made those pledges to Pakistan yet, it doesn’t take a Sherlock Holmes to predict that Russia would side with China in any international conflict. China, Pakistan, and India all possess ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and sea-based nuclear weapons, which means, it would be interesting if India could side with China and its historical rival Pakistan after all. India is stronger than Pakistan in terms of its army power; Pakistan has more nuclear weaponry than India, which means A LOT in any global conflict. Even the western countries and allies have no idea if India would side with them in an international conflict either.

The situation may further take a drastic shift if Iran also allies with the possible new superpower triangle and then this alliance may oust the US and allies from the Middle East. This phenomenon is relatively important in the backlash of ongoing Syrian crisis. When the current Syrian conflict first erupted in 2011 and then enflamed in 2012, a small minority of the American public probably wondered why President Obama was not intervening to help the Syrian people as he had done in Libya.  First, American involvement began with funding arming, and training violent rebels to try to overthrow the Syrian government.

Later attempts to misrepresent so-called intelligence to justify military intervention against Assad in 2013. Finally, like a dream come true, Washington was then able to capitalize on the growth of ISIS in Syria, a growth predicted by own security establishment in 2012, which then became an excuse to start bombing Syrian territory in 2014. By interfering so forcibly in the affairs of Syria, the U.S. has forced a number of countries notably Iran, China and Russia to step up and strike back at U.S. efforts to destabilize the region.

Since the beginning of the conflict, Iran has been heavily involved due to the fact Syria is an important ally to the Islamic republic, bound by a mutual defense agreement. Much to the anger of the US, just this week, Iran allowed Russia to strike Syrian territory from its Hamadan air base. Iran is supplying ground troops, and high level training to Syrian pro-Assad forces. They are also providing a credit line and Iranian involvement is growing in tandem with the two nuclear powers also working in defense of the Syrian regime.

At the same time, Russia has a history of being involved in Syria, but following its direct military intervention last year, they have shown they can set up their own no fly zone within the country at any moment (note that the Russian intervention is arguably legitimate given that they have received authority from the Assad regime to do so). Despite this, they have continued to extend a hand to Washington to achieve their stated goals of defeating ISIS together.

China has sided with Russia and Syria for some time now, using its veto power at the UN Security Council level to block resolutions on Syria after Russia and China were completely duped by the Security Council resolution on Libya in 2011. China has warned the U.S. against attacking Syria and Iran, and now, they have officially stated they are looking to join the fight on the side of the Syrian government, further complicating the issue from Washington’s standpoint.

Unless the U.S. wants to confront these players directly, it has no choice but to accept that they have lost a war they directly and indirectly started through covert CIA operations that began in 2011 (and as some would argue, well before that). This isn’t a loss in the Iraq or Vietnam sense which are arguably victories in the eyes of the elite class. Rather, the Syrian war is an operation that has left them with less influence in the region than when the Syrian crisis began.

Erum Akbar

Author is an executive editor of Melange and Secretary Information Center Of Pakistan And International Relations

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*